Recycled garden path.

Garden Path into Art

 

Recently I decided to renew the path through my garden. It is open to the public, and on a steep slope, so updating the path and making it easier for visitors to access was crucial.

 

Finding suitable material was a challenge. The path is on a slope and curves around corners, and the loose chips and wooden edging (made from recycled fence wood) served its purpose but was never ideal.

 

However following a visit to Michaelswood, in Aith (have you been? You must visit if not!) I saw the perfect solution. Certain parts of the path there are made from a chunky wooden plank walkway with galvanised chicken wire laid over it for grip. I decided to use this method, and now that it’s in place it looks great, and importantly, feels good to walk on.

 

When cutting the planks down to the right length I was always left with a spare piece of wood, 30cm long. As you know I love to recycle and couldn’t see these pieces going to waste, so took the opportunity to design a new style of painted wood art.

 

I already paint onto recycled scaffolding boards, but these are often quite difficult to transport – too large for visitors from abroad to carry home with them, for example. However these new pieces are a much easier size to manage.

 

The first one has sold already, to the Netherlands no less! I have another 10 painted, some are in stock at Mackenzies farm shop in Cunningsburgh, and the others are on my website.

 

 

By |2017-09-07T14:30:03+00:00September 7th, 2017|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Recycled garden path.

About the Author:

My story of becoming an artist definitely begins with the garden.- Highlands. I designed and created a garden from the 1 acre waste ground surrounding our house, which is on a challenging steep slope, with fantastic views. I started the same way as I would any piece of artwork and looked at the size, shapes and textures choosing certain colours of plant combinations to fit the layout. I had some previous experience growing and caring for plants, so knew which conditions suited which plant type.